This blog originally founded by Blogger who holds a theological degree and a doctorate in Counseling Psychology. Taught Psychology for 32 years and is now Professor Emeritus. Is a board-certified psychologist and was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award in his profession. Ministered as a chaplain, and pastored Baptist and Episcopal churches. Publications cover the integration of psychology and theology. Served in the Army, the Merchant Marines and the Peace Corps.

Sunday, January 24, 2016

There Are Conservatives and There Are Conservatives


In a comment by me reacting to the National Review’s attack on Trump, I called the writers, "the establishment." A reader who goes by the nom de plume Cyclops, responded with:
"Establishment? You must be kidding. The majority of these NR writers are hard right conservatives -- Eric Erickson, Glenn Beck, Andy McCarthy, Thomas Sowell, Cal Thomas, Katie Pavlich, Mona Charen, David Boaz, David McIntosh and Brent Bozell--none of them can be fairly described as the GOP establishment."

On TV this morning one pundit called those writers "the intellectual wing of Conservatism ." I thought that was an interesting contribution to the question of who is a conservative. Later this morning Trump responded to the criticism that he had not always been one of the intellectual conservatives but was a conservative now, and added, "just like Reagan."

With that in mind, I would like to propose that there is a type of conservative which I identify as people who grew up. Quoting St Paul who wrote "When I was a child I spoke and thought and reasoned as a child does. But when I became a man, my thoughts grew far beyond those of my childhood, and now I have put away the childish things." (I Cor. 13:11 TLB)

Becoming a grownup can turn you into a legitimate conservative. (A friend of mine even said "I am voting for Trump because he is the grownup in the crowd.")

13 comments:

Blogger said...

I identify myself as one who grew out of the indoctrination I got in college. Conservatism for me is low taxes which results in limited government which results in empowerment of the people.

Blogger said...

LOL I wanted to write "one Cor. 13:11." I didn't know however if everyone would catch the humor. Anyway, for those who don't, Trump quoted "two" Cor. at Liberty University.

Blogger said...

The pundit was comparing the intellectual conservatives to the populist conservatives and included Rush Limbaugh and Hannity in the latter and who are more positively disposed towards Trump.

Sarkazein said...

Paul is lucky TRUMP didn't really come down on him for screwing up the number thing.

Anonymous said...

Blogger

Not even conservatives know what conservatives want to conserve. Conservatives don't agree with each other on what conservatives beliefs are except everything that's wrong can be blamed on "Those People" those people without wealth or political power cause all of our problems. The other thing Conservatives agree on is all problems can be solved by more tax cuts for the rich, more guns, more prison, and more war.

Anonymous said...

What's true about angry conservatives are they hate everybody, They hate Liberals, Democrats, people of color, Gay, Latinos, Muslims, public servants, yankees, RINIOs, The Pope, the establishment, public school teachers, Unions, environmentalist, hippies, pot smokers, low wage workers, journalist, and some, their own children.

Blogger said...

Trump is not running as a true blue Conservative. He presents an amalgam of positions, from a hard-right stance on illegal immigration to a center-left view on protecting entitlement programs to a liberal appeal to tax hedge-fund guys. Howard Kurtz Media Buzz

Cyclops said...

The problem I have withTrump is that he appears to have no core principles to guide his political positions. He is good at taking an issue that is currently subject to intense emotional reaction and turning it to his political advantage. But as President, he would be faced with other emotional issues that are championed by the Left such as an increase in the federal minimum wage or campaign finance "reform", just to name a couple. (The latter, BTW, would work to his political advantage since he can afford to self-finance his campaigns while others need to rely on big money contributors).

And since Trump seems to have no real interest in furthering the interests of the Republican Party (or some other key conservative issues), his election would do little to strengthen other GOP candidates or make a lasting contribution to conservative causes. Even if one believes he could defeat Hillary, which I believe is extremely unlikely, his tenure as President would be disappointing at best for conservatives.

It's tempting for those of us fed up with politics as usual in Washington to want to rub Trump in the faces of the Republican and liberal establishments. But that will result in little success for conservatives causes in the long run.

Blogger said...

Cyclops, I read this in the WSJ by Peggy Noonan: "“Why is it important that a president have previous governmental experience? (Here I will add that I have seen longtime officeholders start out with fire and idealism, only in time to learn too well what isn’t possible. “We can’t get that through.” “We lost on that one last time.” They quietly give up; their sense of reality becomes a lethargic pessimism. Mr. Trump, new to political office, would not know what’s impossible. Leaders like that, if they also have talent, wisdom, popularity and organization, can occasionally make the impossible happen. Is it worth the chance?” I think so.

Anonymous said...

Face it fellas, America does not have conservative values or want a conservative as president.

Cyclops said...

Blogger, It is not essential for a president to have previous government experience, but it is probably helpful in most instances. But it is essential to have a set of principles to guide a president's policies, appointments, etc. While there will usually be a need for compromises, the compromises should all be geared to making further progress toward an underlying principle of governance. For example, it may not be possible to end Obamacare in one fell swoop. But a pragmatic conservative can make deals to chip away at its core provisions that can eventually lead to its inability to remain politically and economically viable.

And previous government experience can give a candidate a vision of what is politically possible. Tell me, do you really believe Trump, as President, could deport all legals residing in the U.S.? Do you believe he could make Mexico pay for building a border wall? Do you think he, acting alone, could ban all Muslims from entering the U.S.? Those are just some of the promises he couldn't keep.

But what about policies that he probably could implement? Do you really think it would be a good idea to start a trade war with China or Mexico? Do you think it would be a good idea to enlist Vladimir Putin as our primary ally in the Middle East?

If he gets the GOP nomination, I will support him against Hillary or any other liberal. But I have little hope he could make a difference in the leftward drift of the country in the long run and instead suspect he would bolster, however inadvertently, the progressive movement in the U.S.

Anonymous said...

What is a fresh new conservative idea?

What conservative policy will best help your children?

Sarkazein said...

Not aborting them.